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Needs and Priorities Assessment

131

needs and priorities assessment

Table 76.

City of Raleigh Resident Per Unit Surplus/Deficiency Based on North Carolina Medians and Existing City LOS

Facility Type

State Median

Population

Per Unit***

City of Raleigh Deficit/(Sur-

plus) Per Unit Based on State

Median Pop. Per Unit (2011)

City of Raleigh Deficit/(Sur-

plus) Per Unit Based on State

Median Pop. Per Unit (2035)

City of Raleigh # of Units

Needed Based on 2035 Pop. to

Match 2011 Pop. LOS

Baseball Fields

7,764

20

42

12

Softball Fields

10,870

10

26

12

Football Fields

54,349

8

11

N/A

Soccer Fields

13,587

23

36

8

Multi-Purpose Fields

27,174

(4)

3

16

Basketball Courts (outdoor)

9,058

(21)

(2)

28

Tennis Courts

5,435

(35)

(3)

47

Volleyball Courts

36,232

(14)

(8)

11

Picnic Shelters

5,435

6

37

30

Playgrounds

6,794

(42)

(16)

43

Indoor/Outdoor Swimming Pools

54,349

(3)

0

5

Trails (Miles)

(includes paved and unpaved)

3,045

55

112

35

* 2011 populations based on July 2011 American Community Survey, U.S. Census. Raleigh: 416,468, Wake County: 929,780

** 2035 populations based on Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) projections. Raleigh: 590,560, Wake County: 1,513,674

*** Number of units is based on information from the 2009-2013 North Carolina Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) and City of Raleigh

Parks and Recreation Department data

A third approach explored to better determine existing

LOS is analyzing the level of access that residents have

to park facilities. This is typically measured as a distance,

either in miles or travel time. The City of Raleigh has

not established access standards for park and recreation

facilities in the 2030 Comprehensive Plan. However, the

following park types and facilities were analyzed using

distances consistent with the park classification or park

type each facility is typically found in. Facilities types

analyzed are also consistent with facilities identified in

both surveys included in this chapter. Elements analyzed

include:

Existing Park Classifications Types:

Neighborhood Parks- 1/2 mile and 1 mile (Map F)

Community Parks- 2 miles (Map G)

Metro Parks- 5 miles (Map H)

Nature Preserves Parks- 5 miles (Map J)

Neighborhood-Based/ Walk-to Facilities:

Playgrounds- 1/2 mile (Map K)

Picnic Shelters- 1/2 mile (Map L)

Outdoor Basketball Courts- 1/2 mile (Map M)

Greenway Trailheads - 1/2 mile (Map N)

Tennis Courts- 1/2 mile (Map O)

Community-Based/ Walk-to or Bike-To Facilities:

Gymnasiums- 2 miles (Map P)

Dog Parks- 2 miles (Map Q)

Baseball/Softball Fields- 2 miles (Map R)

Recreation Centers- 2 miles (Map S)

Outdoor Swimming Pools- 2 miles (Map T)

Metro-Based/ Bike-to or Drive/Transit-to Facilities:

Disc Golf Courses- 5 miles (Map U)

Skate Parks- 5 miles (Map V)

Indoor Swimming Pools- 5 miles (Map W)

Art Centers- 5 miles (Map X)

Maps F-X

identify gaps in accessibility for each park

classification and facility type listed above.

3.7.4 Existing Access LOS Analysis