Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  74 / 210 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 74 / 210 Next Page
Page Background

Chapter Three

74

needs and priorities assessment

O

b

s

e

r

v

a

t

i

o

n

s

Q

u

a

n

t

i

t

a

t

i

v

e

Q

u

a

l

i

t

a

t

i

v

e

Chapter Two, Existing Conditions Overview, utilizes a

number of observational techniques to better understand

the current condition of parks, recreation facilities/

programs and greenways throughout the City of Raleigh.

These techniques, though valuable to the System Plan team,

do not provide the data needed to fully understand how

residents use, value and envision their parks, recreation

facilities/programs and greenways. This chapter documents

two additional research types, qualitative and quantitative,

which allow the team to gather this input through public

participation, community surveys and inventory analyses.

In their singular form, each technique provides only a

snapshot of information, but when combined, these three

research types form a mixed methods, triangulated approach,

which can demonstrate overall trends in needs and priorities.

Thirteen comprehensive methods of input or data collection

were utilized as part of this triangulated approach. (See

Figure

3.

) Though some techniques are more statistically valid than

others, by utilizing a comprehensive array of 13 techniques, the

System Plan team can cross check results to better determine

an accurate understanding of the city’s needs and priorities.

Public participation is the cornerstone of the qualitative

technique method. For the City of Raleigh’s Parks,

Recreation and Cultural Resources System Plan, a multi-

faceted approach to public participation was developed

that was consistent with the city’s recently adopted Public

Participation Policy (2012). A primary goal of the plan’s

public participation was to provide opportunities for

geographical, topic specific, and policy related input.

The first element of the public participation phase of the

project included conducting four community meetings in

different geographical regions of the city, as well as one teen

workshop over a two week period. The second element

consisted of conducting 19 topic-based focus groups for

various park and recreation topics. The third element

included stakeholder interviews with city administration

and department leaders at the City of Raleigh. The

final tool utilized for public participation was a public

engagement website

(www.yourparksyourfuture.com)

that was launched on September 17, 2012 and remains

operational throughout the entire system planning

process. The following are summaries of findings for each

method.

Four community meetings were held throughout the

City of Raleigh in geographically distinct areas: Green

Road Community Center (Northeast Raleigh); Chavis

Community Center (Southeast Raleigh); Carolina Pines

Community Center (Southwest Raleigh); and Lake Lynn

Community Center (Northwest Raleigh). In addition,

a teen workshop was held at the Chavis Community

Center in order to gain input from this valuable age

segment of the Raleigh community. Each meeting was

publicly advertised in print, by flyers posted throughout

the community, email blasts by the Department, website

postings, and business card handouts.

Priority

Needs

Figure 3:

Data Analysis Process Diagram

Observational Techniques:

a. Individual Park and Greenway

Evaluations

b. Population & Demographic Overview

c. Recreation Programs and Services

Assessment

Qualitative Techniques:

a. Intercept Interview

b. Focus Groups

c. Planning Committee

d. Community Workshops

e. Websites

f. Online Survey

Quantitative Techniques:

a. Citizen Opinion and

Interest Survey

b. Peer Comparison

c. Level of Service Analysis

d. High Level Lifestyle

Analysis

Section 3.0

|

Approach

Section 3.1

|

Public Participation

3.1 Overview

3.1.1 Community Meetings