economic benefits
3
Sustainability Report 2013
T
he City of Raleigh’s national
reputation as a “sustainability hub of
innovation” — embracing public-private
partnerships and leveraging collaboration — reaps
significant increased business investment, job
growth and entrepreneurship in the growing green
and creative economies.
EXAMINING TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP INVESTS DOLLARS WISELY
Extracting the best value from long-term public investments
requires big-picture thinking. Better capital investments may cost
more initially, but evaluating their return over a longer
horizon provides opportunities to save taxpayer dollars
and reduce wasted resources.
SMALL BUSINESS IS BIG ECONOMIC FOCUS
Small businesses play a vital role in the growth
and development of Raleigh’s economy, and the
community continues to be a hot spot for small
business innovation and development. The City’s
Economic Development Department partners closely
with other Raleigh business-focused organizations to
promote opportunities, connections and resources.
INDIVIDUALIZING COST BENEFITS OF SUSTAINABILITY
Through its leadership and willingness to explore technologies,
the City of Raleigh helps quantify financial impacts of green
decisions. Whether it’s the energy savings return on simple
weatherization techniques or the potential for reducing hard-
earned money spent at the gas pump through the purchase of a
plug-in electric vehicle, Raleigh helps individuals understand just
how sustainability makes sense.
EQUAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ARE A PRIORITY
The City of Raleigh provides small disadvantaged minority and
women-owned businesses equal opportunities to participate in
all aspects of the City’s contracting and procurement process.
The goal is to award 15% to this group, with a sub-goal of 8% to
minorities and 7% to women, for each project in construction
contracts over $100,000 and in general purchases.
During fiscal year 2011-12, 48% of City of Raleigh
purchase orders were fulfilled withinWake County, and 30%
from within Raleigh.
CLEAN ENERGY JOBS
POWER LOCAL
ENTREPRENEURIALISM
According to the
North
Carolina Sustainable Energy
Association
, 228
firms with
activities in the solar energy
sector account for approxi-
mately 1,900 full-time equivalent
positions, or 13% of North Carolina’s esti-
mated 14,800 clean energy industry jobs.
These jobs are distributed throughout the
solar energy supply chain with the majority
of the jobs (~48%) in the installation, design,
and developer field. The greater Wake
County region boasts the most clean
energy firm offices of any county in North
Carolina at nearly 400 reported clean
energy establishments.
One phenomenal success story comes
from an individual who attended Raleigh’s
Green Building Training solar photovoltaic
class. Building on the knowledge and rela-
tionships established in class, Capstone
Civil Group employed more than 300
workers in the field for a year installing six
utility-scale solar photovoltaic projects in
North Carolina that will send power directly
to the local utility provider. With more than
10
additional contracts in place for 2013,
the firm plans to more than double its in-
the-field workforce.
CLEAN ENERGY
JOB GROWTH
2003 04 05 06 07 08 09 2010
fASTEST-GROWING SEGMENTS
Smart Grid +79.7%
Recycling & Reuse +30.7%
Public Mass Transit +24.5%
Professional Energy Services +24.4%
250
200
150
100
jOBS iNDEX (2003=100)
brookings.edu/metro/clean_economy.aspx
Raleigh Area
United States