mobility & transportation
5
Sustainability Report 2013
t
he City encourages sustainable
infrastructure, including electric vehicle
charging stations, affordable transit, bicycle
lanes and greenway trails. Multi-modal transportation
improves air quality; alternative fuel vehicles and
innovative products encourage a cleaner and healthier
environment for Raleigh residents and workers.
CITY PROVIDES TRANSPORTATION LEADERSHIP
Complete streets and universal access, coupled with advances
in technology such as LED streetlights and bus-tracking apps,
improve transportation choices. Raleigh strongly supports
regional transportation initiatives, and prioritizes
growth and investments based on strategic transit
corridors. The free R-Line bus expands Downtown
Raleigh access, and coordination of Capital Area
Transit and Triangle Transit schedules enhances
service. The City is also exploring electric buses,
and the cutting-edge technology of Evatran —
plugless, hands-free wireless charging infrastructure
for electric vehicles.
BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLANNING ON THE FAST TRACK
From 2009 to 2012, Raleigh’s four miles of bike lanes grew to more
than 22 miles; federal grant funds will increase the total by 40-50
miles. Expanding the award-winning greenway system, adding
70
bike racks downtown, and outreach helped the City earn
bronze status as a Bike-Friendly City. Raleigh was chosen to host
the inaugural North Carolina Bicycle Summit as recognition for its
commitment to cycling. Raleigh’s new Pedestrian Plan identifies
missing infrastructure and includes techniques and programs
to encourage walkability. With public approval of the 2011
Transportation Bond, the City made an $11-million commitment
to adding sidewalks and repairing pedestrian infrastructure.
FLEET OPTIMIZATION REVS SAVINGS
Measures to optimize the City’s fleet operations include vehicle
right-sizing; remote operations centers strategically positioned and
stocked with alternative fuels; fuel consumption (rather than dollars)
budget; pilots to test technologies such as propane fueling and
anti-idling batteries; and an electronic motor pool to share vehicles.
Sustainable transportation treats cars, bicycles, pedestrians
and transit equally; providing easy mobility choices and
alternatives improves public health and the environment.
ELECTRIC VEHICLE
INFRASTRUCTURE &
OUTREACH SPARKS
A NEW ERA
Recognized as a global
leader in the
2012
EV
Casebook: A Look at the
Global EV Movement
by Center
for Climate & Energy Solutions
(
C2ES), the City removed barriers to
plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) adoption
by addressing building codes, electrical
codes and ordinances related to uniform
standards, signage, parking and fees for
charging. The City also streamlined permit-
ting and inspections for resident EV supply
equipment installation as part of Rocky
Mountain Institute’s
Project Get Ready
.
Raleigh’s leadership role extends to the
statewide PEV adoption taskforce, a col-
laborative working group examining
barriers to PEV adoption and proposing
solutions throughout North Carolina.
According to the Environment North
Carolina report,
Charging Forward: The
Emergence of Electric Vehicles and Their
Role in Reducing Oil Consumption
, 11,810
North Carolina drivers could purchase their
first plug-in vehicle by 2015. These vehicles
could reduce the state’s greenhouse gas
emissions by a minimum of 10,726 metric
tons annually while reducing oil depen-
dence in North Carolina by 2,770,278
gallons each year.
FLEET VEHICLE
ALTERNATIVE
FUELS
10%
ETHANOL
8%
BIODIESEL
3%
HYBRID
2%
ANTI-IDLING BATTERY
1%
ELECTRIC
1%
PROPANE
1%
NATURAL GAS
26%
of City fleet
vehicles use
alternative fuels
as of 7/1/2012