MyRaleigh

Fire Station Rainwater Harvesting Project

Last Modified: July 27, 2012
These projects received funding from the ARRA Federal Stimulus Package and North Carolina's Clean Water Management Trust Fund.
These projects received funding from the ARRA Federal Stimulus Package and North Carolina's Clean Water Management Trust Fund.
 
Two of the cisterns installed at Fire Station 23 on Pinecrest Road.  The cisterns are connected to a pump and hyrant for the fire fighters to use.
Two of the cisterns installed at Fire Station 23 on Pinecrest Road. The cisterns are connected to a pump and hyrant for the fire fighters to use.
 
Fire fighters at Fire Station 23 use the harvested rainwater to wash their fire truck.
Fire fighters at Fire Station 23 use the harvested rainwater to wash their fire truck.
 
Four cisterns were installed at Fire Station 8 on Western Boulevard.  The cisterns are connected to a pump and hyrant for the fire fighters to use.
Four cisterns were installed at Fire Station 8 on Western Boulevard. The cisterns are connected to a pump and hyrant for the fire fighters to use.
 
Two cisterns were installed behind Fire Station 6 on Fairview Road in the Five Points neighborhood.
Two cisterns were installed behind Fire Station 6 on Fairview Road in the Five Points neighborhood.
 
Fire fighters at Fire Station 6 use the harvested rainwater to wash their fire truck.
Fire fighters at Fire Station 6 use the harvested rainwater to wash their fire truck.
 
This driveway drain at Fire Station 6 captures the wash water used from the cisterns and routes it to a rain garden behind the building.
This driveway drain at Fire Station 6 captures the wash water used from the cisterns and routes it to a rain garden behind the building.
 
One of the three cisterns installed at Fire Station 24 on Fossil Creek Court in the Brier Creek area.
One of the three cisterns installed at Fire Station 24 on Fossil Creek Court in the Brier Creek area.
 
This cistern is tucked around the side of Fire Station 25 on Wakefield Crossing serving the Wakefield area.
This cistern is tucked around the side of Fire Station 25 on Wakefield Crossing serving the Wakefield area.
 
Two cisterns installed at Fire Station 28 on Forestville Road.
Two cisterns installed at Fire Station 28 on Forestville Road.
 

The City of Raleigh's Stormwater Management Division partnered with the City of Raleigh Fire Department to initiate a new effort to green several fire stations by installing rainwater harvesting systems and rain gardens.

Project Team

The City of Raleigh sends its thanks to all project partners including Wake County, North Carolina State University, and NC Cooperative Extension. The City of Raleigh is proud to be working with Cape Fear Rain Water Harvesting, Inc. and Fluvial Solutions, Inc. as the contractors for these projects.

Special thanks to all funding sources for this exciting project allowing the fire stations to Go Green! This project was awarded grant funding in 2009 from the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund. Additional funding was awarded in 2009 as Federal Stimulus Funds from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Current Activity

Construction was completed in 2010.

Status: Complete

Project Scope

The City of Raleigh Stormwater Management Division and Wake County are partnering to sponsor eleven project locations receiving a network of cisterns, also known as rainwater harvesting systems. These cisterns will collect rainwater draining off existing rooftops at each facility so that it can be reused for outdoor water uses. Water records have shown that individual fire stations can use as much as or more than 4,000 gallons of water each month for training exercises and washing equipment outdoors. The goal of this program is to replace this use of Wake County's drinking water supply with the harvested rainwater collected in the cisterns.

The use of these rainwater harvesting systems will have multiple benefits for the local area.

  • Harvesting rainwater will reduce the demand on our drinking water supply and promote water conservation.
  • Harvesting rainwater decreases the volume of stormwater runoff, which prevents stream bank erosion and improves water quality by reducing pollutant loads in our streams.
  • The project sites will serve as educational and demonstration opportunities for residents in the community.

Below is a list of the eleven project locations receiving rainwater harvesting systems.

Of the eleven project locations, five are installing rain gardens. Rain gardens, also known as bioretention devices, are mulched flower beds that are designed to capture stormwater runoff that would otherwise run off the site to other areas downstream. The water usually stays ponded within the rain garden for 1-2 days as it slowly drains through the soil underneath the mulch. As the water drains through the soil, it is naturally filtered and cleaned before draining through the underground stormwater drainage pipes into the nearest stream or lake.

Below is a list of the five project locations receiving rain gardens.

Budget

The total budget for the project including design, construction, and monitoring was $389,000. The Clean Water Management Trust Fund awarded an Innovative Stormwater Grant to the City of Raleigh Stormwater Utility for $125,000 in February 2009 for the project. The project was also awarded $280,000 from federal stimulus funding in the form of a principle forgiveness loan and a zero interest loan in June 2009.

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