Public Utilities Department

Last updated May 17, 2016 - 8:52 am

The City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department provides water and sanitary sewer service to approximately 180,000 metered water and sewer customers and a service population of approximately 530,000 people in Raleigh, Garner, Wake Forest, Rolesville, Knightdale, Wendell, and Zebulon areas.

Mission: To provide safe, sustainable water services for our customers while protecting public health and contributing to the economic, environmental and social vitality of our communities.

Public Utilities Multi-Year Business Plan

Proposed Water and Wastewater Rate & Fee Increases (FY 2016-2017)

In an effort to improve communications with our valued utility customers, the Raleigh City Council and Public Utilities staff share the following proposed water and wastewater utility rate and fee increases which would be effective in billing beginning July 1, 2016 if approved.

Proposed Rate Increase Information

Customer Notices & Alerts

Proposed Water and Sewer Rate & Fee Increases for FY 2016-2017
[Posted April 18, 2016]

Glenwood/Oak Park Area Pressure Zone Switchover Project - Rescheduled for April 19th at 6 a.m.
[Posted January 9, 2016; Updated March 21, 2016]

No Switch to Chlorine-Only Disinfection in 2016
[Posted January 8, 2016]

In August of 1993, the City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department modified the drinking water disinfection process to utilize ammonia in combination with chlorine to form chloramines. Chloramines are very effective disinfectants and significantly reduce the production of disinfection byproducts such as trihalomethanes (THMs), which are highly regulated drinking water contaminants.

However, in order to ensure optimal disinfection throughout the water distribution system, North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality required the City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department and all other public water systems using chloramine disinfection to switch to chlorine-only disinfection for a minimum of three (3) consecutive weeks every year. This switch to chlorine-only disinfection usually occurs from late February through the first week of April, and can produce a “chlorine taste and odor” in some cases. However, due to improvements in water distribution system management, the City of Raleigh has been able to maintain optimal disinfection levels and received permission from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to forego the switch to chlorine-only disinfection in 2016.

The City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department conducts extensive water quality testing throughout the water distribution system to ensure our drinking water meets all State and Federal drinking water requirements. View Water Quality Reports

For additional information or questions, please contact Edward Buchan at 919-996-3471 or edward.buchan@raleighnc.gov

Utility Customer Alert: Residents Should Be Aware of Private Solicitations for Water Sampling [Reposted December 2015]

There continues to be a number of private companies performing mass mailings and placing water sampling door hangers soliciting residents to purchase water filtration systems. Some of these door hanger solicitations include “water sampling kits” and indicate "Urgent Community Water Test". Please be aware that these mailings and door hangers are not issued by nor endorsed by the City of Raleigh.

Customers should be aware that accurate water quality sampling requires very specific collection and handling protocol, as well as a laboratory certified by North Carolina to run industry accepted test methods.
North Carolina certified laboratories

The City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department conducts thousands of water quality analyses throughout the year to ensure the drinking water you receive meets or exceeds all Federal and State drinking water regulations. It should also be noted that Raleigh’s drinking water is considered “soft” with a measured hardness usually under 30.00 milligrams/liter as CaCO3, and therefore should not require a “water softener” system. In comparison, water with a hardness of 120.00 milligrams/liter as CaCO3 or above is considered “hard”. More information on Raleigh’s drinking water

If you are a City of Raleigh water customer and have concerns regarding your water quality such as discoloration or an unusual taste or odor, please call the Public Utilities Operations Division at 919-996-3245.


Public Utilities Information Bulletin to Replace “At Your Service”
[Posted December 2015]

Beginning in January 2016, City of Raleigh utility customers will notice that the At Your Service publication, which comes with their monthly statement, will be replaced with a new concept that will primarily focus on news related to Public Utilities.

“Your Service Connection” will provide customers with information on topics such as major water and sewer infrastructure projects and updates, water efficiency incentive programs, tips to save, options for paying their monthly bill, and other informative topics relating to Public Utilities programs and services.

The City of Raleigh continues to provide information on many topics previously covered in “At Your Service” via the City’s website www.raleighnc.gov and via MyRaleigh Subscriptions, a free, subscription-based service that allows citizens to elect to receive email notifications on topics of interest such as alerts, newsletters, meeting agendas, project updates, and recreation information.

“Your Service Connection” will be included in monthly utility statements.

Customer Alert regarding Private Company Solicitations for Water and Sewer Line Protection Services
[Posted April 11, 2012]

Residents in our service area (Garner, Knightdale, Raleigh, Rolesville, Wake Forest, Wendell, and Zebulon) often receive solicitation letters concerning purchasing protection coverage for water and sewer lines on their property. These mailings are worded in a way that the offer appears to be a collaborated effort between the company and the City of Raleigh and/or other local municipalities. Please be aware that these solicitations are not endorsed, nor are the companies contracted by the City of Raleigh to offer water or sewer service line insurance coverage on the City’s behalf.

If you have further questions regarding the validity of these types of mailings, please contact:

Check out a company with Attorney General Roy Cooper’s Consumer Protection Division at 1-877-5-NO-SCAM before you do business with them.

City Increases Reward for Reporting Illegal Discharges/Dumping into the Sanitary Sewer System. View Brochure | View Poster | View Video

City of Raleigh Official Utility Payment Locations are the only payment sites authorized to accept your payments. View Official Utility Payment Locations

In the News - Raleigh's Public Utilities Department

Public Invited to Drop off Expired or Unwanted Medications at Four Raleigh Locations on April 23, 2016

Citizens are invited to drop off unwanted or expired medications at four Raleigh pharmacies during a Prescription Medication Drop-Off Event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 23, 2016. All collected medications will be disposed of safely.

The City of Raleigh Substance Abuse Advisory Commission and the City’s Police, Housing and Neighborhoods and Public Utilities departments are sponsoring the free event to help prevent the abuse of prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Citizens can take their unneeded or expired medications to the following locations:

  • Blue Ridge Pharmacy, 2601 Blue Ridge Road across from Rex Hospital;
  • Falls River Pharmacy, 10930 Raven Ridge Road;
  • Hayes-Barton Pharmacy, 2000 Fairview Road; and,
  • Josef’s Pharmacy, 2100 New Bern Ave.

Many of the people who abuse prescription drugs get them from unsuspecting family and friends. Children ages 12-17 abuse these drugs more than any other illicit drug except marijuana, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy. The Prescription Medication Drop-Off Event will help keep drugs away from those who might abuse them. It also provides a safe alternative to flushing unneeded or expired medication, which could taint our rivers, streams, lakes and drinking water supplies.

Markers will be available at the event to black out personal information on prescription labels.

For more information, contact Cathey Ector in the City’s Community Services Engagement Division at 919-996-6100 or cathey.ector@raleighnc.gov.

The City of Raleigh Substance Abuse Advisory Commission advocates for the prevention and treatment of alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse. Its members are volunteers appointed by the Raleigh City Council.


Imagine A Day Without Water | October 6-8, 2015
Mayor McFarlane proclaims Wednesday, Oct. 7th "Imagine A Day Without Water" Day in Raleigh.

Could you go a day without water? No water to drink or make coffee. No water to shower, flush the toilet, or do laundry. Join us as we raise awareness about the most essential resource we have: Water. Visit Value of Water Coalition to find out more about Water's Value.

Crabtree Pipeline Project
Construction Global Magazine | September 2015 | Pages 96-105
The City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department Undermining Overflow

WRAL.com | August 11, 2015
Crabtree Creek Project Will Ease Flooding but Cause Street Closures
Crabtree Pipeline Project
City of Raleigh Partners With Conservancy to Protect Lands in Falls Lake Watershed
July, 2014
The City of Raleigh has contributed towards protecting a critical tract of land in the Falls Lake Watershed.

What's Inside This House?
WUNC.org, January 16, 2014
The ordinary-looking house on Wade Ave actually disguises a pump station for the City of Raleigh Public Utilities.

Public Utilities Mascots

In 2014, the City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department acquired two new mascots, Johnny the Running Toilet and Sir Water Raleigh to help with our outreach efforts.

Learn more about the Public Utilities Mascots

Utility Billing

Washing sponge

Depending on whether you live in Raleigh, Garner, Knightdale, Wake Forest, or another area, find out who you need to call for a new water account and meter.

Learn more about Utility Billing

Treatment Plants and Other Facilities

Treatment Plant

The City of Raleigh owns and operates three wastewater treatment plants and two drinking water treatment plants in the City's utility service area which provide services to a population of approximately 500,000.

View Plant Information

Cross Connection Control Program

Cross Connection Control

Protecting the City's water supply by overseeing the installation, regulation, and testing of backflow assemblies installed between cross connections, backflow assemblies prevent contaminants from the consumer's property entering the water supply which could pose a health hazard or pollution of the water.

Learn more about Cross Connection Control Program

Industrial Pretreatment Program

The City of Raleigh Industrial Pretreatment Program permits, inspects, and surveys customers who may be discharging industrial wastewater. Pretreatment refers to the treatment of non-domestic wastewater before it is discharged to the wastewater treatment plant, also known as a POTW, or publicly-owned treatment works.

Learn more about the Industrial Pretreatment Program

Environmental Services Program

The Environmental Services program works to protect and restore natural resources, by keeping our city clean, safe and livable through water and wastewater treatment, promoting proper disposal of used cooking grease, helping to protect our watershed and drinking water supply from pollution...and much more.

Read More About...

Lead in Drinking Water From Household Plumbing

Water Conservation and Efficiency

Water Conservation

The City of Raleigh has initiated several programs to help educate our customers about the most water efficient technologies and to understand the City's mandatory conservation measures.

View water supply status and conservation stages

Learn more about water efficiency and conservation programs

Reuse Water System

Reuse Map

Reuse water (also known as reclaimed water, recycled water, or non-potable water) is highly treated wastewater that can be re-used for irrigation, pressure washing, vehicle washing, toilet flushing, or cooling towers, instead of being discharged into a waterway.

Newsletter

Learn more about Reuse Water System

Hydrant Meter Program

Hydrant

Hydrant Meter Rentals provide temporary potable water services to customers within the City’s service area through connection to fire hydrants.

Commercial and Residential customers must apply for a hydrant meter before using water from a fire hydrant for construction, landscaping, demolition, street cleaning, drinking fountains for public events and other approved uses.

Fees are based on the length of use, and billing for the hydrant meter(s) will occur one time per month.

Policy | Application

Business Planning

Strategic Planning is an organization's process of defining its strategy, or direction, and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy.

In this section you will find several plans and presentations that will help you better understand our department's mission and vision. Through the various tasks and initiatives outlined in these plans, we venture towards our goal of becoming a world-class utility service provider.

Learn more about the department's Multi-Year Business Plan

Public Utilities Handbook

The City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department has prepared this handbook to summarize the policies, standards, and specifications of the Department.

The Raleigh Public Utilities Department has the responsibility for operating, maintaining, repairing, replacing and expanding the water, sewer, and reuse systems of the City of Raleigh and the towns of Garner, Rolesville, Knightdale, Wendell, Zebulon and Wake Forest.

2014 Public Utilities Handbook

Appendices

Material and Construction Standards

Was this page helpful?

Technology named Raleigh

Third Best for Science

View our accolades >>